RSS

Posts Tagged ‘iphone’

Casual Friday: iPhone Apps I Probably Couldn’t Live Without

Posted by

Last Friday, I detailed my general computing setup so that those of you who like to see what other geeks use to get things done could enjoy some serious nerdery. This week it’s the same gig, only the iPhone edition.

I could go on forever with this stuff, but I’m only going to talk about the apps I use a lot, where a lot means several times daily. Believe it or not, I get asked this question a ton (“What app do you suggest for #TOPIC?”), and if I’m honest I always pore over other nerds’ app selections. It’s sad, too, because if I read posts like the one you’re about to, I’ll be out five or six bucks by the end — guaranteed.

So, you’ve been warned. Here’s the first of two parts. Part two will be published next Friday, so if you’re into this sort of thing (high five if you are!), check back then.

WEATHER

My go-to weather app is Dark Sky, followed by My-Cast. I use Dark Sky primarily, but I also find MyCast very good if I get the feeling Dark Sky is lying to me. I love the sparkline graphs in My-Cast, but the hour-by-hour predictions in Dark Sky are uncannily accurate.

NOTE TAKING

There is passionate debate about this app segment — just take a look at Brett Terpstra’s massively, world-bendingly detailed comparo. While I really want to geek out and try at least half of these, I just stick with what I’ve been using happily for years: Simplenote. It syncs perfectly, has Dropbox integration, and offers a web client for note taking and random jotting while you’re at your computer and you think of your next hilarious cat picture caption. It supports tags, note sharing, and versioning. It has a cool icon. Really, just go get it. It may not do everything some of the other iOS editors do, but what it does it does perfectly. I pay for the pro version.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Man, if you could see the nightmarish folder I have stuffed full of iOS photography apps. In the end, though, all I really use for taking pictures are Instagram, Camera Awesome and Camera+. If I had to pick one, I have no idea what I’d do: I like Camera Awesome despite it’s frat-boy name, and Camera+ is a legit ‘photographer’s photograpy app’. Instagram is a daily thing for me because I like to think I’m a decent photographer (I’m not) and people like to see what I shoot (they don’t).

For editing apps in post on my iPad or iPhone, I use Snapseed or Apple’s own iPhoto, which is more advanced than meets the eye. I try not to do too much photo editing on iOS, though, as I prefer using a desktop. Call me old school. Kids today, editing real photos on touchscreens. Bah! Get off my lawn!

PODCASTS/PODCATCHING

I’m a huge podcast nerd, and I use Downcast pretty much every time I get in a car. In fact, Downcast alone has pretty much eliminated the need for my car to have a functioning radio or CD player, because it’s that good over Bluetooth. Other people swear by Instacast, but I’ve not tried it. I mention it here because it gets too much buzz by people I respect not to. Check them both out and pick the one with the prettiest screenshots. That’s what I always do.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Seeing how I’m a web nerd and spend my days staring at glowing screens reading about the salmon other people are having for lunch, this is a pretty big category for me.

For Twitter, I use Tweetbot, easily the best Twitter client I’ve ever used anywhere. I use Facebook for, well, Facebook, although I’m finding it increasily slow and buggy and frustrating to use. I use Foursquare a lot too, although I have a sinking feeling every time I voluntarily tell an anonymous server in the sky where I am. I use WordPress and Squarespace for blogging and shortform web writing. Anytime I find a cool link, I save it with the mobile version of Pinboard because there’s a .0003% chance I’ll remember it otherwise.

TASK MANAGEMENT

When I’m on the road and need to record something to remember, I use Captio to send an email to my Gmail, where I have a filter that breaks all Captio messages into their own inbox for easy parsing. From there, I transcribe them into my second brains: Due and Apple’s Reminders app. A giant part of productivity — at least for me, because I have a zillion things to track and unless I get it out of my brain and on to a list somewhere, the idea is as good as doomed — is organization and remembering the ideas that come to me out of nowhere. I tried the pen and notebook thing, and found it too manual.

So. Here I am at 923 words, and I could keep going for another 2,000 if you let me. Which you won’t, and I don’t blame you. Check back next week for part two if you want, but if you don’t it’s OK with me. So totally OK.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and LinkedIn.

About this blog.

Casual Friday: A Web Geek’s Hardware/Software Setup Revisited

Posted by

About a year ago, I wrote a post detailing what hardware and software I use on a daily basis, a la The Setup’s format. I know I never tire of knowing what fellow geeks are using to be productive. Perhaps you’re the same. If so, you’re in luck. Here’s my updated setup.

My big takeaway, which hit me as I wrote this: it’s amazing how much changes in a year.

What hardware are you using?

In the office, I use a 27“ iMac running a quad-core Intel i7 clocked at 3.4 GHz. It’s a monster, sporting 16 GB of RAM, a 256 GB SSD boot drive, and a 1 TB SATA data/scratch drive. I have a giant, loud, hulking Das Keyboard Professional Model S for text entry, seeing how I do an absolute ton of it. I also have a second Apple 27” display attached to this iMac, and I’m pretty certain that if NASA called me today and said hey, run our space program, I could without having to change much. This setup is pretty much my dream rig.

At home, I donated my old 2008 MacBook Pro and moved to an iMac 27″ for heavy lifting (quad-core i5, 12 GB RAM, 1 TB SATA for storage, http://www.directics.com/altera-fpga/). Heavy lifting here means photo and video editing, mainly. It too has a monolithic Das Keyboard chained to it, and while I hate the looks, the writing purist in me appreciates its tactile feel and obnoxiously loud noise.

Mobile computing gets a bit messy for me. I have an 11″ MacBook Air, which I consider an iPad Pro, and I love it to death. This makes my new iPad (or iPad 3, as many mistakenly call it) a bit of an outlier, because I split time between the MBA and the iPad. If I had to choose only one, today it would narrowly be the MBA. Over time, however, I think we’ll see the most innovation with iOS.

Because three Macs and an iPad aren’t enough, I have an iPhone 4S, which almost never leaves my side. My main gripe about it is the AT&T service, which I swear will change when the new iPhone 5 (or whatever it’ll be called) comes out, at which point I will jump to Verizon’s LTE and never look back.

So what software do you use?

I still run Google Chrome almost exclusively, and have very few problems with it – it’s a great piece of software. When I do need a second browser, I use Safari. As I write this, I have 32 tabs open.

For longform writing, I do most everything these days in Byword, using Markdown formatting for plain text. (All my writing these days is plain text, because I will never need to worry about being beholden to a certain app or rich-text formatting data structure in the future). When I’m done writing for the web, I export the HTML out of Byword and slap it into whatever CMS I’m using.

For mail, I am still a giant, swooning Gmail nerd. To me, using older clients like Outlook our Entourage just grinds me, and I’m not productive in them. Gmail has ruined email for me – in a good way.

For photo work, I use either Lightroom 4 or Aperture 3. I would like to settle on one, but I am trying them both out to see which best fits my needs. So far, I think I like Lightroom 4 best. Aperture, while having Photostream support and being much more ‘Apple’, is slower and uses a ton of RAM. Plus, Lightroom’s noise reduction is phenomenal, even when working with OOC JPEGs.

For video, I use Apple’s Final Cut Pro X. It’s a heavyweight, but if you can get past the learning curve, it can do almost everything you ask of it.

I said before I would die without Dropbox, and I stand by that. I use it daily.

For capturing the random thoughts that pass through my head, I use Captio to send an email to myself, or, if I have more time, Simplenote. From there, many to-dos go directly to my Fantastical calendar, or my iPhone’s Reminders app.

For taking pictures, I mainly use an Olympus OM-D EM–5 micro 4/3 camera with a prime lens (either the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 or the Olympus 45mm f/1.8), and it’s fantastic. If anything heralds the demise of giant, slapping, mirror-box DSLRs, it’s pro small form factor cameras like the OM-D.

For social media monitoring, I use Hootsuite. Yes, I pay for it, and yes, it’s worth it. For general web bookmarking for things I find interesting or want to save for later, I cannot recommend Pinboard enough.

What would be your dream setup?

A year ago, I said I would like a quad-core iMac with oceans of RAM and storage. I pretty much have that now, so all I’m missing is a search engine for my brain. Because I’m 43 and sometimes forget to wear pants. You know.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and LinkedIn.

About this blog.

Apple’s Dominance, In Context

Posted by

We all read the headlines today that position Apple as one of the most powerful companies on earth. Most everyone understands the magnitude of Apple’s ascent from the doldrums of the late 1990s and early 2000s. But do you really understand Apple’s power in the market? If you’re not a hopeless Apple nerd like me, allow me to provide you some context:

Last Thursday, Apple’s stock hit $494/share, making Apple worth more than Microsoft and Google — combined. When you look at what Apple purportedly has lined up for this year, you realize they still have tons of upside. How successful will the iPad 3, iPhone 5, and rumored Apple TV/iTV be? I wouldn’t bet against them.

And then there are the observations from David Leonhard over at the NYTimes Economix blog:

• With a market value of about $460 billion, Apple is worth more than Google, Goldman Sachs, General Motors, Ford, Starbucks and Boeing combined.

• Apple is now worth almost twice as much as Microsoft (about $258 billion) and more than twice as much as Google ($198 billion).

• It is also worth more than twice as much as General Electric (about $202 billion), I.B.M. (about $224 billion) or Wal-Mart ($212 billion).

• Apple — ranked 35th in the Fortune 500, which is based on annual sales — is worth eight times as much as the company just below it on the Fortune list (Boeing, at about $56.5  billion). Its value is 20 times as much as the company just above it (Medco Health Solutions, about $23.4 billion).

If you want a glimpse of just what the iPhone hath created, understand that today, Apple’s iPhone business is bigger than Microsoft in its entirety. Let that sink in for a bit. Even if you removed the iPhone business from Apple, what’s left of Apple would still be worth more than Microsoft. 15 years ago, Apple was on the verge of death. And now this? Amazing.

Finally, in 4Q of 2011, Apple took 80% of all profits in the mobile space. Eighty. Percent.

All this from a company that a decade ago was making candy-colored iMacs and this thing called an iPod, which was not met with a favorable popular reaction.

My, how times have changed.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 1/27/11

Posted by

Unabashedly Waxing Poetic on Apple From a User’s Standpoint

I started using Macs when they were powered by the Motorola 68000’s and Berkeley Breathed anthropomorphized one in Bloom County. Even back then, in the miasma of the awakening WinTel juggernaut and whiffs of Amigas and Atari STs, Macs were considered niche machines. I wrote my first dozen short stories on that little Mac, and after upgrading to a Mac SE/30 I went through high school with that little beige box on my desk. The Mac, and the Commodore 64 that preceded it, were my first technology proving grounds.

Later, because I was a hopeless gaming nerd, I migrated to Windows PCs for a stint. I built my own rigs. I spec’ed my own motherboards, hard drives, RAM chips, cases, power supply and garish-colored fans. When GPUs were invented, I pored over every polygon each had the potential to push. I had become a full-on hardware nerd.

My stay on the Windows side of thing lasted longer than I expected, because that happened to be the same time Steve Jobs was exiled from Apple and John Sculley began his seemingly-intentional grounding of the company into any rocky shore he could find. The Windows PC era was in full bloom, and nobody outside really dedicated typesetting/design studios ever thought about Macs again. Everyone thought Apple had been relegated into insignificance; Michael Dell even suggested that Apple should sell the stock back to shareholders and ‘shut the company down’.

In the early 2000’s, as real life became more real and I wasn’t spending my nights fragging strangers in Rocket Arena 3, I was looking for a more elegant computing setup. My giant, power-sucking, room-heating beast of  PC was too much, Windows was too boring, and I longed for something new. As it turned out for me, everything old indeed does become new again.

I did something that made everyone laugh at me: I bought an overpriced, shiny, white MacBook. That was back in OSX 10.1 days, when the OS was unquestionably immature and limited to the point of being annoying. It was also during the very beginning of Apple’s real resurgence, a movement that saw the iPod give way to the iPhone, and the introduction of what many argue is the new modern-day portable computer: the iPad. It also heralded a bona fide Mac explosion.

Today, I’m Apple everywhere, for better or worse. I have an iMac, MacBook Air, iPhone 4S, iPad and Apple TV. Everything just works. My days of fiddling with Windows and building my own machines have given way to technology that enables me to do what I want, easily, effortlessly. I  know it’s bad form to gush uncontrollably about a tech bias in public, but Apple has done something amazing with itself over the past 12 years, and I’m proud to say I’ve been along for (most of) the ride, through the doldrums as well as the ascent. To me, and from the perspective of the user, Apple is a brave company, one that stands for higher standards and holds a focus on user experience that is in its DNA, as opposed to watery marketing fodder, they do know how to follow the king kong digital marketing agency reviews through every step.

A few days ago, Apple announced a historic quarterly earnings report. Even by the hyperspazzy standards of Wall Street analyst wonks everywhere, Apple absolutely showed that it is winning pretty much every battle its fighting. Scratch that — it’s not just winning, it’s dominating.

Apple announced sales of $46 billion. Think about that. Here’s a $100-billion-plus company growing at a 73% clip, which simply isn’t supposed to happen. Sales in Apple’s past quarter exceeded its entire 2009. And this year, we’re looking at the iPad 3, the iPhone 5, probably an Apple TV reincarnation, and who knows what else. What’s for sure is that this momentum shows no signs of slowing.

Some other interesting trivia in light of Apple’s performance:

Data shows that shows PC shipments waning — except at Apple.

Farhad Manjoo puts things in perspective for anyone who can’t get their head around what Apple just announced: Apple’s profits ($13 billion) exceeded Google’s entire revenue ($10.6 billion).

At Verizon, 55% of all phone sales for 4Q 2011 came from iPhones. That means two iPhone models (the 4 and 4s) outsold every Android device the carrier offers combined.

Finally, here’s the ultimate framework in which to look at Apple’s data: it just posted the second-most-profitable quarter in any company’s history.

Where’s Charlie Sheen when you need him? Oh, he’s right here.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Windows Phone Was a Response to Apple’s iPhone

Posted by

Josh Ong, reporting for AppleInsider:

Microsoft’s head of software design for Windows Phone has admitted that the company completely redesigned its mobile operating system platform as a response to Apple’s iPhone and the “sea change” it created in the industry.

Joe Belfiore, one of the first engineers brought to the new Windows Phone team when it was formed, made the comments in an interview with The New York Times.

“Apple created a sea change in the industry in terms of the kinds of things they did that were unique and highly appealing to consumers,” he said. “We wanted to respond with something that would be competitive, but not the same.”

According to the report, “once the iPhone exploded into the marketplace, Microsoft executives knew that their software, as designed, could never compete.” In December 2008, Microsoft’s then head of mobile engineering called a meeting to decide the fate of its aging Windows Mobile software. Seven hours later, Myerson and his team decided to scrap the OS and start again from scratch.

One could argue extremely cogently that everything that has happened in the last five years in the mobile market was in response to the iPhone.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: 2011 Holiday Edition

Posted by

A Note About Blogging Frequency

As we head into the holidays, posting will be a little light here. It’s not that I don’t love you guys, but I’m pretty sure/hopeful you have other things to be doing over the next two weeks than reading a blog. If you seriously can’t get enough, I have two suggestions: 1) check your meds, and 2) don’t be afraid to click around our Categories (first right-hand sidebar, third section) for stuff you might have missed.

Also: Thanks

We started this blog back in late 2008. It began by drawing two, maybe three, visitors per day. Eventually we got up to 25 unique visitors per week. I still remember the first time we cracked 100 visitors in a week, which was right around March 2009. It was slow going.

Today, we have about 5,000 unique visitors per month, and our pageviews are upwards of 35K. The crowning moment for me was when I was walking through Detroit Metro airport one day in late 2009. I had my MIPRO shirt on, as I was returning from a user group. In the elevator heading to the parking deck, a gentleman looked at my shirt and said, “MIPRO, huh? I know you guys.” I asked him if he was a client and he said, “Not yet, but I read your blog every day.”

Really?  That’s bananas.

It’s easy to sit here behind my monitors and hammer these words out and ignore the fact that people out there read our stuff on a daily basis. I’d even go so far as to say that it’s a necessary mindset for serious writers/bloggers: you can’t sit around and worry about how your audience will interpret your stuff.  You either write, or you don’t, and it’s OK to have an opinion. But it still blows my mind when someone emails me or tells someone on the MIPRO team that they dig our blog. If you’re a blogger yourself, you know how cool that feeling is.

So I want to say thanks to all of you, the readers. Without you this would be our own private echo chamber, and there’s no value in that for anyone. We started this blog to share thoughts and opinion with you, not rattle around our own dumb ideas to each other. That’s what we have lunches for.

Enough already. Do I get to read some links or something?

Yes, you do. I wouldn’t dare send you into the holidays with stress, fruitcake, eggnog and insane relatives looming at every corner without some stuff to read.

Is your holiday soup or casserole too fatty? There’s an easy solution to help skim out some extra fat, but you have to be quick. Drop an ice cube into it, as the ice will attract the fat, and you can easily scoop it out with a spoon. But be quick, because in case you haven’t noticed, ice melts quickly in hot things.

As a staunch iPhone user, I admit I’m more than a little intrigued by the new Galaxy Nexus.  Here’s Danny Sullivan’s review of the new Android flagship, and it’s the most balanced I’ve read. It’s a review that talks about day-to-day life with the Galaxy Nexus and spends very little time submerged in the newness of the handset and Android 4.0 (dubbed Ice Cream Sandwich, or ICS).

Slate.com on The Old Fashioned, a drink I often order to get a guaranteed sneer from the bartender that says, “Seriously dude? What are you, 80?”

The best Longreads of 2011. If you’re a fan of longish and amazingly well-written articles, don’t miss this list. There’s some great stuff here.

Jimmy Kimmel asks parents to play a trick on their kids as an early holiday gift prank. The results are awesome.

Happy holidays, everyone.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Gazelle reports BlackBerry trade-ins at an all-time high

Posted by

From Gazelle.com, the popular service that offers cash for your old electronics as you prepare to upgrade:

Earlier this month, the trade-in of BlackBerry devices climbed, but in the past week, the number of these trades skyrocketed by 80%. This spike coincided with the launch of the iPhone 4S, says Gazelle Chief Gadget Officer Anthony Scarsella.

RIM used to be the darling of the mobile technology world. Now, they can’t buy a break.  Amazing how quickly tides change.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Oracle Mobile BI

Posted by

We have discussed OBIEE and its analytics capabilities in detail in previous blog posts here on Unfiltered.  So it follows that we’d call out that Oracle announced the availability of a new Oracle BI Mobile option, which allows any OBI 11g customer to deploy all their existing dashboards to mobile devices (iPad, iPhone) without any re-programming or manual porting efforts.  In today’s remote-but-connected work environments, the ability to have analytics always available is key.  As we have emphasized in the past, BI is much more than reporting, and having mobile capabilities allows you to make business decisions while traveling and away from the office. We’re not talking second-rate representations of your dashboards and analytics, either — we’re talking about the real thing. In mission critical environments, no longer do you have to wait days to take action if  you’re away from the office.  In many instances hours (let alone days) can be critical, so extending BI analytics to mobile devices can have a very broad positive impact.

Below are links to two short but very good demos on Mobile BI applications. You should check them out.

  1. Here’s an intro to Oracle Mobile BI.
  2. Here’s a brief rundown on Oracle Financial Analytics Application for mobile.

After reviewing the demos, if you have any questions, please let me know. As always, I’m happy to chat.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Irresponsible Speculation About Today’s iPhone Event

Posted by

This time, Apple has done a good job of keeping the next-gen iPhone a secret. Aside from some hints purportedly provided by Asian case-makers, a slip in iTunes code that suggest an ‘iPhone 4S’, and some wishful thinking about a new iPhone 5 that predicts the same approximate form factor as the MacBook Airs, we really have no idea what’s going to happen later today (1 PM EDT/10 AM PDT).

There are a ton of websites out there that have cast their opinion on what Tim Cook will announce in a few hours (man, it’s hard not writing ‘Steve Jobs’); I find the most cogent among them this piece by John Gruber.

Still, I wouldn’t be doing my job if I didn’t throw out what I feel will come to the supplicating masses. So below are a few of my guesses, and let it be known that I have no idea whatsoever is actually coming.  Hence, guesses.  Here goes:

  • First, an iPhone 4S will be announced, which will basically be an iPhone 4 with the A5 CPU (same as what’s in the iPad 2) and some upgraded internals. Capacities might also rise to a 64 GB ceiling. On this model, I can see the camera staying at the current 5 MP rating.
  • An iPhone 5 will be announced, and I’m one of the few who still think it will have a different form factor than the iPhone 4S. I can’t see the iPhone 5 looking exactly the same as the 18-month old iPhone 4 and (if it’s announced) the mid-market iPhone 4S. Whether this new form factor is ‘teardrop’-shaped like the rumor suggests I have no idea, but if pinched I would say yes, it will have some resemblance.
  • If there is indeed a iPhone 5, I expect a larger screen (3.7″ or 4″) and new, 8 MP camera with a stronger flash in a different location on the back side of the case. I also expect an improved battery and even 4G support (even though 4G is the greatest battery hog ever).
  • The iPhone 3GS will be discontinued; I can’t see Apple selling it into 2012. The low-end model will be the iPhone 4, the mid-market product the 4S, the flagship the 5.
  • We’ll get a demo of the latest build of iOS 5, in which I expect to see a full demo of Assistant, the voice-operation technology that’s essentially a marriage of Siri (which Apple purchased a couple years ago) and Nuance (with whom Apple is rumored to be working). I expect Apple’s implementation to finally get voice right: it wil be easy and extremely accurate.
  • I see the iPhone 4S/5 being available just before the end of October. Ditto for iOS 5.
  • Finally, I expect Sprint to be added to Apple’s stable of iPhone carriers. In fact, this seems to have already happened.

So there you have it: complete speculation by a guy who has no affiliation whatsoever to anything Apple.

Oh, and let’s be clear about one thing: if there is only an iPhone 4S announced (better CPU and camera), people will whine and cry like you’ve never seen before. On one hand, they’d be silly to: the iPhone 4 is Apple’s most successful mobile device ever. On the other hand, it would be a bit disappointing to see what amounts to a CPU bump and camera upgrade after 18 months. Other handsets are advancing nicely, and I don’t think this is the time for Apple not to knock them all back on their heels a bit and give them something new to try and copy.

There you have it. Complete and utter groundless speculation.  Agree? Disagree? Think I should be working for Apple? Let me know in the comments.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 7/8/11

Posted by

When I tell people I do web/social media marketing work, that basically I’m a full-on web nerd, they look at me funny.  Like, “Oh, how long have you been unemployed?” funny.  After we get past that initial awkwardness, they invariably ask two things: (1) Can social media help my business? And (2) What is your computer hardware/software setup like?

For this Friday post, I will tackle both questions.

For (1): yes.

For (2), I will answer in the format of The Setup’s interviews, because I can read that stuff all day and have found some excellent software from them.  Here goes.

What hardware are you using?

In the office, I use a super-gonzo Dell Precision laptop running Windows 7 Professional connected to three 24″ monitors.  Multiple monitors are the single best thing you can add to your setup next to a jetpack to improve productivity, and I would be far, far slower without them.  If you don’t have multiple monitors but can afford them/are allowed to by your IT team, you’re cheating yourself.

At home, I use a pretty banged-up early 2008 MacBook Pro with 4 GB of RAM that’s connected to a 2002 HP 2335 LCD monitor.  I use Apple’s wired keyboard because I have to have a number pad for data crunching, and I have a filthy — disgusting, really — Logitech wireless mouse whose model number I can’t remember because it was made before the dawn of language.

I have a first-gen iPad that I use for everything except longform content creation.  It’s awesome, if a bit heavy and sharp-edged.  Still, it has replaced a laptop for 90% of my tasks when my son isn’t stealing it to play Dungeon Raid.

Right next to my iPad you’ll almost always find my iPhone 4, which I take with me everywhere.  Literally, everywhere.  Well, except the shower and the gym, but aside from those caveats, everywhere.  I’m not sure if I own it or it owns me.  I suspect the latter.

And what software?

Being a web dork means having a romantic relationship with your browser, and I am an unrepentant Chrome devotee.  It runs on both my work and home laptops.

For longform writing, I get all weird: I will use Ommwriter, WriteRoom, BBEdit, Sublime Text or even the WordPress editor.  It depends on my current propensity to get distracted.  For a pure, clean blogging on the Mac, I couldn’t live without MarsEdit.  On Windows, Windows Live Writer 2011 is pretty solid, if a bit slow (thanks .NET!).

For mail, I am a gigantic Gmail nerd.  Gmail might be the best implementation of email in the world.  And by might I mean is.  At work, I have to tolerate Outlook, which is really starting to feel like something wet, angry and smelly that crawled onto my computer from the late 1990s.  Because it is.

For keeping the soul-crushing silence at bay and the voices in my head arguing amongst themselves instead of with me, I fire up iTunes or Rdio.  Lately, a lot has been Rdio.

For keeping track of stuff, I use Notational Velocity on my Mac and SimpleNote on the web and iPhone/iPad.  I would probably keel over dead within a half hour without Dropbox.  Whenever I have a thought that doesn’t fall apart like a soggy box after a few seconds of critique, it goes into one of these apps for later curation.

For photography, I use a Nikon D90, Canon S90, or my iPhone 4 (don’t laugh — it’s the most popular camera on Flickr).  For post work, I use iPhoto, Photoshop CS5 and occasionally Acorn, which is a terrific OSX application that does, for me, 90% of what I use Photoshop for.  On my iPhone, I am a huge Instagram evangelist, along with Camera+ and Photogene.

For social media stuff, I use Tweetdeck on Windows (still wish it was a web app though) and the official Twitter client on my Mac.  I have an entire monitor devoted to Facebook, blogs and Google+ sessions running in Chrome.

What would be your dream setup?

My MacBook Pro is getting long in the tooth, and the screen does a weird flicker thing against certain gray backgrounds, so I’ve been thinking about a replacement.  I’m torn between two masters: portability and power.  The idea of a new 27″ quad-core iMac is very appealing because of the screen real estate and power, but it’s a desktop and who buys those anymore?  On the other hand, I’m waiting for Apple to stop being so jerky and release the new MacBook Airs with the Sandy Bridge architecture so maybe that will be enough power and I can nerd out in lightweight, sealed, portable style.  (That option might actually steal time from the iPad.)

Oh, and I’d like software that does what I think, no questions asked.  That’d be cool.  Also, Google search box for my brain because, yeah, it’s come to that.

Shut up about your dumb nerd stuff.  Do you have any links?

Yes, yes I do.

This man won $3.4 million — and then went back to work as a janitor.  The world needs more people like this.

Here’s a site that provides the best introductory books for myriad topics.  Tons of browsing pleasure here, folks.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

###

More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.