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Posts Tagged ‘health’

Casual Friday: An App That Tracks and Quantifies Your Sleep. Yes, Really.

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I’ve talked about sleep before, and how it relates to health. I’m a nerd that way. I think sleep is important, and most of us don’t get enough of it and what we do get is often poor quality.

So, that said, can I tell you about something I like?

There’s an iPhone app called Sleep Cycle that purports to do what nigh borders on magic: track your sleep quality and report in the morning on how well you slept. How does it do it? The iPhone’s gyroscope, mostly, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it uses unicorn tears either, because what began as skepticism with me changed into full-on belief/amazement five days later. In a word, it works as promised, so much so that I have no choice but to echo the other reviews this app has received: it’s amazing.

The exact voodoo Sleep Cycle uses to determine sleep depth is a mystery, but again, at a basic level, it uses the iPhone’s gyroscope to detect movement. Increased movement = lesser sleep quality, but I’m sure there’s more math to it than that. In my experience, I found that the app perfectly tracks my cycles of being awake and deeply asleep.

Example: I get up at 3 AM to go to the bathroom. It knows and records it.

Another: I typically have my deepest sleep around 3:45 AM. I know this from 43 years of being alive. Sure enough, the app knew it in one day.

The concept is simple: you place your iPhone face down on the corner of the bed nearest you. The instructions say place it under the top sheet, but I don’t. You must leave your phone plugged in, because the iPhone is ‘conscious’ overnight as the gyroscope collects movement data.

That’s it. You go to sleep, and it goes to work.

When you wake up, you flip off the alarm (if you have it set; more on that later) and you get your sleep report card:

This is your sleep results dashboard: you can see your sleep quality hour by hour (ranging from awake to deep sleep), and after five days, the app will start giving you a percentage ‘sleep quality’ score based on what it knows about your sleeping (and movement) patterns. When you wake up, you can have the app ask you how you feel: good (happy face), average (normal face) or lousy (sad face). You an also set up sleep notes like ‘stressful day’ or ‘worked out’ or ‘had drinks’ and the app will start to correlate these notes with sleep quality scores.

Like most quantified-self apps, this gets better the more you use it. It’s database grows pretty robust, so your results get increasingly accurate over time. If you’re into poring over the raw data, the app even provides an option to show it to you in the Settings menu.

If you flip your iPhone to landscape orientation, you get a bevy of additional reports. Here are a few:

Sleep Cycle also has an innovative alarm function: it will wake you in a time range (say, 6:30 AM – 7:00 AM) when it detects you’re sleeping the lightest. That way, the logic goes, you’re not jarred out of a deep sleep, which tends to make humans wake up with bared fangs. It has a regular alarm too (which wakes you up at a static time), but from what I found, the smart alarm works as advertised.

What can I say? This app is modern-day magic, and you’re probably not getting enough sleep as it is. If you’re at all a performance nerd like me, you should stop reading and just go get it. You probably spent two grand on a fancy mattress, so spend a buck on this and see where it gets you. Available on the App Store.

(Full disclosure: I have zero financial interest or stake in Sleep Cycle. I just think it’s modern technology put to a good use, and a smartphone app innovation showcase. Plain and simple.)

Have a good weekend, everyone.

Casual Friday: Riffing on Health, Exercise and Nutrition

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I see you injure yourself a lot. Can you help me?

When I’m not being an annoying blogger/web wonk, I often do athletic things like lift weights, play soccer and injure myself. When people see me do these things (even including the injury part, oddly), they invariably ask me questions about how they can get in shape, what they should eat, what workout program they should do, and why my neck makes crunching noises.

Instead of try to be coherent and give anyone who’s interested a logical guide to these questions, I will instead secrete a bunch of bullet points from my finger motion, which are below. If you are an astute reader (and you are), you’ll notice these are in no discernable order. That’s OK, because order isn’t important, mainly because I lack the discipline right this second to infuse this post with even the slightest bit of structure. And if you’re honest with yourself, you’re reading this before your first meeting, Starbucks coffee in hand, while the printer spits out some documents for said meeting that you’ll doodle on for 45 minutes. So let’s not get carried away with formality.

So, yes, anyway. These bullet points about health and fitness:

  • I wish everyone would understand that fat isn’t necessarily the enemy. We’ve been led for years to believe fat is what makes us fat, and that’s calorically-speaking: fat has 9 calories per gram, whereas carbs and protein only have 4. So, with over double the caloric value, fat must make you fat, right? Not really. It’s not the main culprit.
  • Sugar is the main culprit, which means instead of counting fat grams, you better start moderating your carb intake. Without getting into the biochemistry and forcing you to pass out face-down on your keyboard, let’s just say carbs invoke your body’s insulin response, which in turn stores excess sugar (glycogen) as fat. Excess or wrong-type carbs create a metabolic cascade that is very much at the center of the obesity problem we’re seeing today.
  • Again: don’t freak out about fat. I know you want to. Everyone does. But understand that your fat-free dressing is full of nasty vegetable oil and additional sugar and salt to make it even somewhat palatable, which is far, far worse than a couple tablespoons of olive oil on your salad. Eat real food.
  • Exercise isn’t optional. It really isn’t. Yes, you can manage your weight by keeping a really tight diet, but eventually you will cheat or fall off. We all do. Without stoking your metabolic furnace, you’re really pushing a boulder uphill.
  • What kind of exercise? Not endless cardio. I tell folks to lift heavy things 2–3 times per week for no longer than 30 minutes, and to sprint twice per week, but there are many option like kickboxing, Martial Arts Classes, and boxing. If you can’t run, do very short, intense 20 second intervals on a bike, rowing machine, or elliptical. Intervals mean you should go at 90–100% of your max effort for 20 seconds, then take 40 seconds to recover. As your fitness improves, you’ll be able to reduce your rest interval all the way down to 10 seconds. Doing 20 seconds of high-intensity work followed by 10 seconds of rest is known as the Tabta Protocol. In just eight minutes you can get a better cardio and metabolically-stimulating workout than 45 minutes doing steady-state cardio work.
  • When you lift, don’t be afraid of going heavy. Heavier weights build more muscle, and they hit metabolic pathways that help you burn fat, gain lean tissue and even impmrove your cardio capacity. Ladies, you do not have the hormones required to put on much bulk, so concerns about you turning into a hulking, stinking she-devil are unfounded.
  • Walk. A lot. As many times as you can per week. Beats the heck out of staring at TV.
  • Don’t ignore sleep. Amazing things happen in your sleep, and I’m not talking about having that dream where you are a robot superhero and fly around on a chocolate dragon. I’m talking about tissue recovery and growth, fat loss, stress reduction – you name it. We’re a nation of overtired, super-stimulated people, and we need sleep. Don’t skimp it – especially if you start exercising more.
  • Avoid grains if you can. I mean it. All grains. I can go on and on about this, but I’d rather refer you to Robb Wolf’s excellent The Paleo Solution or Mark Sisson’s The Primal Blueprint for thorough explanations. This should actually be bullet point #1, but I didn’t want to freak you out right way. (But I am OK with freaking you out now.)

See? No discerable order, yet pretty reasonable advice. Is it Friday or what, baby?

One last thing: supplements. Everyone asks what supplements they should take. Here’s what I recommend:

  • If you can’t get enough protein from real food (with enough being .6-.7 grams per pound of bodyweight; more if you are an athlete), get yourself a good whey protein supplement. I use this daily.
  • Fish oil for omega–3 fatty acids. Back when we ate more off the land, we had many more omega–3s in our diet. Today, with the preponderance of grains and processed food, we have a 20:1 omega–6 to omega–3 ratio. That’s way upside-down. We should be closer to 2:1. Fish oil helps this massively. Here’s what I take.
  • Unless you spend a lot of time outdoors, I recommend a Vitamin D3 supplement. Nearly every single blood panel I’ve seen is deficient in this, and often massively so. I use a liquid version.

So. Yeah. Friday post. Okay then.

Seriously, if you have any questions, you let me know in the comments. If you prefer email, no problem.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and LinkedIn.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 8/19/11

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Today I am going to make up questions from imaginary readers and then answer them in a Q & A format. For those of you keeping track, this does indeed mean I’ve gone completely bananas. Then again, I’m starting to think that’s what you expect from these Friday posts.  Here goes.

Q: Seriously, are you nuts?

A: Probably. I’ve been told such on more than one occasion. I tell myself it’s all in the name of creativity and being a ‘writer’ (note the apologetic quotes there), but I don’t think I’m fooling anyone, including myself. On an unrelated note, I’m pretty sure I can communicate with cats.

Q: Are you having a hard time coming up with Friday posts? It sort of seems like you are.

A: What gives you that impression? Just because my last two Friday posts involve made up emails from pretend correspondents and a schizophrenic Q & A self-interview doesn’t mean I’m struggling at all. I’m a professional; I’m well above mere nuisances like writer’s block. To come up with a Friday post, all I have to do is lie awake in bed lightly sweating for a night or two per week, talk to myself, and suppress my growing curiosity about combat knives and we’re all good.  I also argue with podcasts in my car, but that has nothing to do with the creative process.

Q: What book are you reading right now?

A: The Dirty Life, by Kristin Kimball. It’s about a metropolitan chic urbanite-turned-farmer. It’s about the author falling in love with a self-possessed farmer named Mark, choosing a future with him, and the transition from city-dweller to full-on farmer.  It’s fascinating, especially the areas in which Kimball talks about how much work the farming life is, but how much she came to appreciate it’s simplicity, physical labor and connection to her food and ecosystem. Reading it, I can’t help but think we all should be required to work a year on a farm. I think it would result in a lot less whining.

Q: If you could buy any car right now for track purposes, what would you look at first?

A: The 2012 Mustang Boss 302. This thing is ripping up tracks everywhere and besting cars three times its price.  Previously, I would have said a Nissan GT-R, but every time I say this I get into huge arguments with Gayla Burns, a Corvette enthusiast, and then things get thrown and broken and we get put into time-outs by people who don’t understand cars. So now I am aligning myself with the Mustang out of sheer self-preservation, because Gayla has a wicked arm on her. I mean it.  When she was younger, she tells me, she used to throw a pigskin over them mountains.

Q: Can you do any funny accents?

A: Yes and no. I do this flimsy British thing, which is so flawed, so deeply wrong on just about every level, that it winds up something new altogether, which is funny unto itself.  But is it funny because it’s a good British acccent? No. As my good British friend Stuart told me once after a Red Wings game, “You should never again do that accent for any reason, for anyone, ever. You’re embarrassing yourself, mate.” He gave me a solemn look and didn’t smile a bit. Then he ordered a hamburger and that was that.

Q: What are your thoughts on spiders?

A: They’re not insects. They’re subterranean demons who do us the service of eating bugs to endear themselves to us. Address with extreme prejudice.

Q: You’re a strange person and are making me uncomfortable. Maybe we stop doing this and you just give us some links?

A: Yes, okay. Probably a good idea.

Gout is on the rise in America, right alongside diabetes and hypertension. No correlation, I’m sure.  *cough*

If you have an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch, you owe it to yourself to get Shaun Inman’s game, The Last Rocket. It’s a throwback 8-bit platformer, and it brings back the good ol’ days for those of you who grew up with Nintendos and Commodore 64s. Why are you still reading this?

Postcardly turns your emails into postcards delivered in real-life by the US Postal Service. Great for friends and family who don’t use email.

Have a great weekend, everyone.

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More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 8/5/11

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It’s Friday, and that means I get to answer the hundreds of reader emails I don’t get.  From anyone.  Ever.  So what I do is sit around on Thursday night and send emails to myself from ancient, forgotten email accounts, then I answer them. Sad and pathetic? Yes. Sociopathic?  Probably.  But how many well-written, inquisitive emails are you getting from yourself, big shot?  Exactly.

That aside, I do get asked about what I eat for breakfast by people who know I’m into the primal/paleo thing that’s going around right now.  As someone who tries to eat as close to paleo/primal as he can and who is almost always in a fevered rush, smoothies are a blenderful of awesomeness that even I can prepare without messing anything up.  Honestly, I have them five or six days a week for breakfast, and they’re fantastic. Today, because you asked nicely last night, I’m going to share my recipe with you.

You have to be careful with smoothies, even though they’re universally marketed as healthy.  Done wrong, smoothies are a sugar bomb, and the calories climb very quickly if you don’t keep an eye on what you toss into your blender.

Regardless if you’re a primal/paleo nerd or not, just about any modern diet will tell you that it’s all about controlling your insulin response, i.e. how much sugar you ingest. Fearing fat is the stinky potatoes of yesteryear.  In the smoothie world, watching insulin response means traditional standbys like orange juice or apple juice are things you’re going to want to avoid.  You’ll also want to avoid milk, as it’s horrendously over-processed and highly insulinogenic.  Don’t get me started on milk, because I have a ton of things to say and you probably don’t have the attention span to listen to a food nerd go on and on about homogenization.

(I don’t blame you, either.)

Oh I can’t help myself, sorry: If you must do milk in your smoothies, please make the effort to go and find full-fat, raw milk from a farm or similar source.  If you can’t do that, the next best milk I’ve found is Farmer’s Creamery, which is vat pasteurized and non-homogenized.  Don’t opt for skim, because it lacks the fat that helps slow insulin response.

So anyway.

I have been making almost the same smoothie for a year now, and as far as primal/paleo goes, it’s pretty solid.  It’s also full of deliciousness.  Here it is.

Primal/Paleo Smoothie

If you like your smoothies a bit thinner, add water to taste.  Also, if you want more calories, add some heavy cream (I sometimes add one tablespoon).

Making this with the PaleoMeal product, it’s a very reasonable 352 calories.  Usually, the carbs are higher than any other meal I eat during the day, and this is because 4-5 days a week I am in the gym doing stupid stuff to make my body hate me and break itself so I don’t keep doing it.  Every human body needs some glycogen if it’s going to voluntarily injure itself in a gym.

Here’s the smoothie macronutrient breakdown: 9.9g of fat (4.4 saturated), 48g of carbohydrates (only 12g of sugar and 15g of fiber), and 28.3g of protein.  If I’m feeling tired or think I need more help with recovery, I’ll add a half scoop of Optimum Nutrition Natural Gold Standard protein, which adds 65 calories and 12g of protein.

If you happen to be a DailyBurn user, I’ve created the recipe for you here. You’re welcome.

Give it a shot and let me know what you think.  Once you get the hang of it, it’s the healthiest and best quick breakfast going.  The major flaw is a distinct lack of bacon, which is why on the weekends I go insane and eat all the bacon I can cook before I get dehydrated and someone needs to hook me up to an IV.

In addition to the smoothie trick, I have some links for you. Yay? Yes, yay.

What is this crazy primal thing, anyway? If you’re interested, you should head over to Mark Sisson’s site and spend, oh, ten hours there. I know I have.

A great collection of significant historical and cultural Creative Commons or No Rights Reserved audio clips.

This is one stubborn bird.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 4/22/10

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Know This

Steven Soderberg’s media stream: here’s a list of Soderberg’s favorite books, movies, TV shows, plays and short stories he enjoyed over the past year.

The science of why we don’t believe in science.

Does anyone in Silicon Valley care about Windows anymore?  Robert Scoble on the PC-to-Mac ratios he’s seeing in major tech companies, universities, and startups the world over.  Nutshell: there’s a pronounced move to Macs that corresponds to a marginalization of Windows.

Google Video is going dark, and fast.  Here’s the scoop and what you can do to help save it – or at least salvage some of its best content.

The BlackBerry PlayBook tablet, reviewed by Wired’s Mike Isaac.   Can you believe it doesn’t have a native email, calendar or contacts app?  And that it only supports tethering to BlackBerry phones (for now)?  Why was this released in such an unfinished state?

Read This

Malcolm Gladwell postulated in his book Outliers that it takes someone 10,000 hours to become an expert at something.  Well, Dan McLaughlin is putting it to the test: for the next six years, for six days a week and six hours a day, Dan will practice golf to see if he can get a shot on the PGA Tour.  He’s one year in.  You can follow his daily progress here.

Is sugar toxic?  An absolute must-read, especially if you’re keyed into the diabetes and obesity epidemics that are gripping this country.

Watch This

Speed climbing mountains!  In this case, the mountain in question is an ascent of the north face of Eiger, a 13,025 foot tall mountain in the Swiss Alps.  The first ascent took three days in 1938.  Here’s Ueli Steck making the same ascent in 2 hours, 47 minutes and 33 seconds.  About halfway through, he’s literally running up the mountain.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 4/15/11

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Know This

Longer body, longer life?

Amazon introduces $114 ad-supported Kindle to combat Apple’s iPad.  A $25 discount to have your reading experience smattered with ads?  How about a free Kindle with ads?  That’s more like it.  I don’t see the $25 incentive as being anywhere near worth the intrusion of ads while you try to relax and read a book.

How prone are we these days to be quick to criticize?  Consider this little social experiment: someone posted the first page of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest online to Yahoo Answers to solicit ‘feedback’ for ‘his’ book.  The crowd was ruthless.  The moral?  No matter how good something might be you post online, most people, hiding comfortably behind keyboards, will harshly criticize the work — even if it’s a page out of one of the best pieces of contemporary works of fiction ever written.

Clorox made the decision to drop BlackBerry in favor of phones employees want.  The company offered workers a choice of Apple’s iPhone, various Android models, and Windows 7 devices.  The result?  92% chose the iPhone.

$69 for a hot dog.  Not a joke.

Read This

The power of observing and talking to real humans.  Good stuff by Bob Sutton.

The new guy’s computer.  Great blog post by 37signal’s new hire Trevor about how he sets up a new Mac and the tools he can’t live without.  Total nerd fodder here.

Watch This

As part of his inventor expose, David Friedman profiled Steven Sasson, the creator of the now-ubiquitous digital camera.  Here’s the video.

This movie shows all Unicode characters (almost 50,000 of them) at a rate of one per frame for more than a half hour.  Did you have any idea there were so many?

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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More links:

MIPRO Consulting main website.

MIPRO on Twitter and Facebook.

About this blog.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 2/11/11

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Just think: only nine more months until I can type 11/11/11 in the title of a Friday Linkology blog post.  Isn’t that exciting?

No?  In fact, you say, it’s the exact opposite of exciting?pointless

I actually agree, but I went with it because I usually lead into the Friday links with some sort of pointless preamble, and the date thing seemed to nail the pointless quota right out of the gate.

But, like every Friday, I do have some links for you. It’s prudent at this point to remind new readers that these links are selected by way of a proprietary algorithm that was developed in-house here at MIPRO, and what I mean by that is these are basically what I starred in Google Reader after drinking too much coffee and letting my 11th grade sense of humor dictate what you, the reader, will be subjected to on any given week.

Fancy?  You bet it is.  Completely flawed?  Double-down that bet!

The links, without further ado:

European PGA pros shoot at clay pigeons with golf balls.  I can’t tell if this is fake or not. If it isn’t, they went to pretty great lengths to make it seem authentic.

A trained statistician with degrees from MIT and Stanford tries to crack the scratch lottery code.  Best thing I read all week.  Long, but so worth it.

Weight of the world: a Washington Post interactive chart that shows the world’s gain in BMI (body mass index) since 1980.  Startling.  Someone tell me how we’re not trending towards Wall-E’s dystopian vision.

Science: bad food makes you stupid.

A short history of all the major, global disasters that have ever happened to Earth.  I can read stuff like this all day.  (Pretty sure that’s a character flaw.)

Finally, here is a picture of cat in a glass jar.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management) and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More Linkology posts.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 12/17/10

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This is the first year that I have completed my holiday shopping completely online – I have not set foot into a store and actually purchased something on my list from said store.

What’s more, I cranked out my shopping in about 40 minutes – 25% of which was me screwing around looking at things that I found interesting (curse Amazon’s suggestion/CRM engine) – from my couch using my iPad.  I found good deals via Groupon, and a few helpful things from FatWallet, but mainly everything I got flowed through Amazon and its affiliates.

(Think about all the money malls spent this year in decorations, signage, promotions, carolers, creepy elves and Holiday Piano-Playing Guys.  Not a single dollar of that influenced shoppers like me.  Yet, on the web side of things, nearly no investment has been made except to roll out some holiday deals and maybe some more festive colors for banners and buttons.  The infrastructure was already there and imminently flexible.)

I wonder how long it will be before most shoppers do what I did this year: shop from home, never setting tire into traffic, and getting everything done in under an hour.  Imagine if retailers didn’t need to go nuts with redecorating their stores and instead just focused on a smart web experience during the holidays?  How much  money would they save?  How much lower could the overall cost-of-sales be?

Anyway.  Enough about me sitting around on my couch in Adidas trackpants while I look up crazy things like Fitbit on Amazon when I should be ordering GT5.  Let’s get on to the links.

Ninjas unbox a Nexus S smartphone.  Amazing work (albeit in Flash).  Make sure you grab the nunchuks at the bottom of the comments and destroy the page after the video ends.

The 10th Annual Year in Ideas is up on the NYTimes, and it’s amazing.  Especially interesting are the picks from the last nine years that have come to fruition over the course of a decade.

A man has been cured of HIV due to a stem cell transplant.

Filmography 2010.  A mashup of clips from 270 films that were out this year put into a wonderful, actually coherent, stream.  Says its creator: This year’s movies have legitimately transformed my idea of what is creatively possible. To commemorate, I’ve remixed 270 of them into one giant ass video.

Michael Mace (CEO of Cera Technology) on what’s wrong with RIM.  For those of you who think the company is doing just fine because of its recent financial performance, you need to read this article and understand what’s going on behind the curtain.

Finally, here’s the long-awaited (at least by me) trailer for The Tree of Life, due next year.  It’s described as a 1950s period piece, but it’s also about the loss of innocence, dueling life perspectives, and the value of the human soul and unselfish love.  Can’t wait.

The Tree of Life

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management) and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More Linkology posts.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 8/27/2010

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Every Friday, sophisticated algorithms here at MIPRO’s highly-secure analysis datacenter (me) trawl the entire Internet (what I have starred in Google Reader) to bring to you the best (what I find interesting) links of the week so that you have some nice weekend reading (work interference) to help you wind down into the weekend (which started 24 hours ago).  Please enjoy wholeheartedly (please read the first few lines).

Have a Garmin GPS? Your might be part of a recall involving overheating units.  See here for details.

The Beauty of the Power Game: a series of tennis videos from the NY Times depicting famous women tennis players is super-slow motion.  I can’t quite decide if these are superficial and exploitative or artistic and technically informative.  Regardless, it’s always amazing to watch a top-caliber athlete’s technique in slow-motion.  Anyone remember the famous Tiger Woods Swing Portrait?

Drink till you drop: finally, the magic elixir clinically proven to promote weight loss.  Affordable, too.

Mythbusters: fun with gas. Such a fine moment.

Here’s the kitten mittens scene from a It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia trailer.  Gets me every time.

Astronaut prank on a golf course.  Amazed this doesn’t happen more often.

Finally, Ricky Gervais does the David Brent dance.  Probably one of the most famous (and seriously hilarious) scenes from the UK version of The Office ever.

Have a great weekend, everyone.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management), Workday and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More Linkology posts.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 7/16/10

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Did you have time this week to find the very best things on the Internet?  No?  Well neither did I, so I proffer to you this fine quasi-rushed collection of various links below in the hopes that one of them makes your weekend.  Is that a stretch?  Yeah, probably.  Nonetheless, here goes:

Sitting is really bad for you.  This is why more and more progressive offices are moving to a stand-up arrangement for the majority of tasks.

Ed Dale on the iPhone 4 hysteria.  Even with the reception weirdness — which somehow isn’t as bad as it was when I first got it — it’s the best app phone I’ve ever used.

ArsTechnica on how scientists avoid confirmation bias.

I recently re-read The Road and cannot recommend this book more.  It’s dark, bleak and dystopian, but it’s ultimately a meditation on hope and the dedication of love.  It’s not a book you will be able to say you enjoy (even though, at times, the prose approaches poetry), but it’s a story that will stay with you for a long, long time.  Very much warrants multiple readings.

The Market Confidence Bugaboo: Project Syndicate’s Dani Rodrick explains why creating economic policy around apparently-improving market confidence is a fool’s errand.

A collection of truly awful stock photography.

Looking for something other than the standard hamburger?  If so, try the Slavonian burger.  I know I will.

BBC News: Plants ‘can think and remember.’

Finally, probably the most impressive basketball trick shot I’ve ever seen.  And it’s real.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management), Workday and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More Linkology posts.