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Posts Tagged ‘anthropology’

The Unknown Unknowns

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Errol Morris’s new piece in the NYTimes is fascinating to me, as I’ve always noodled the Dunning-Kruger effect around in my mind. And I’ve long held the belief that we act in a social system governed by confirmation bias; that is, we tend towards what we believe or want to believe, both in our learning and actions.

Morris, in his piece, really gets into the holes in our knowledge and how they effect our behavior. This fascinates me, because I’ve been on both sides of conversations that were heated and full of energy only to find one of us was entirely ignorant of an adjunct area of knowledge that played heavily in the rounder conversation.

In Morris’s piece, David Dunning writes:

If I were given carte blanche to write about any topic I could, it would be about how much our ignorance, in general, shapes our lives in ways we do not know about. Put simply, people tend to do what they know and fail to do that which they have no conception of. In that way, ignorance profoundly channels the course we take in life.

Today’s bit in the NYTimes if part one of five. Can’t wait for the rest.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management), Workday and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More nerdery posts.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 6/11/10

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Before I get to the links, let me be very clear about one thing.  Today marks the beginning of the FIFA World Cup 2010, an event spanning 30 days that nearly no Americans care about that is simultaneously celebrated by the restwc2010logo of the world with a nationalistic vigor  that makes the Olympic spirit look like the foothills peppering Mt. Everest.  It’s less a sporting event and more a civil version of globalized tribal warfare, and if you’ve ever seen the crowds at a World Cup match, you know it’s Rome incarnate.  It’s the only sport in the world where if you accidentally score on your own goal during a key match, your career is over. Very over.

I can’t wait.

So speaking of the World Cup, here is the schedule if you feel you want to see what the hype is all about. (Bonus link: typographic World Cup t-shirts!)

Remember our scrambled eggs recipe?  People loved that.  Here’s its sequel: Perfect Popcorn (courtesy of Alton Brown via Good Eats season 10).

Apple Design Award winners for the best iPhone and iPad apps.  Good picks.

The Chicago Sun-Times’s Andy Ihnatko reviews the HTC Droid Incredible and HTC/Sprint EVO 4G.  I’ll spare you the suspense: both are downright amazing smartphones.

What pro videogamers have in common with top athletes.

You’ve heard of BASE jumping from very high fixed objects, right?  Did you know there’s an underwater version of the sport?  Guillaume Nery is a world champion free diver, and he’s done an underwater BASE jump into Dean’s Blue Hole in Long Island, Bahamas, which plunges 663 feet to the bottom.  No tanks, no air supply whatsoever. Check out the absolutely incredible video.  (Confession: I was breathing hard just watching it.)

On distraction: why your mind should go on the occasional information diet.

Extensions for fresh-off-the-press Safari 5. Not bad work for just a few days.

Daring Fireball’s John Gruber with his iPhone 4 impressions.  Astute, as usual.

You Are Not So Smart: a very smart blog about self-delusion. Worth your time.

Video: The Secret Powers of Time.  What is your time perspective? Trust me, this is also worth every bit of the 10 minutes it asks.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management), Workday and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More Linkology posts.

Askers v. Guessers

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An Asker won’t think it’s rude to request two weeks in your spare room, but a Guess culture person will hear it as presumptuous and resent the agony involved in saying no. Your boss, asking for a project to be finished early, may be an overdemanding boor — or just an Asker, who’s assuming you might decline. If you’re a Guesser, you’ll hear it as an expectation. This is a spectrum, not a dichotomy, and it explains cross-cultural awkwardnesses, too: Brits and Americans get discombobulated doing business in Japan, because it’s a Guess culture, yet experience Russians as rude, because they’re diehard Askers.

Probably the best categorization of this personality spectrum I’ve seen anywhere.  And as you might expect, when the extremes of these types are forced to interact, it probably won’t be pretty.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management), Workday and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More nerdery posts.

Linkology: The Best of the Internet for 5/14/10

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One of my favorite bloggers, behavioral economist Tyler Cowen, gets profiled (probably much to his chagrin) in the Washington Post.

John Gruber with Apple-Verizon Political Calculus, 2010 Edition.

Facebook privacy: A bewildering tangle of options.

The Chronicle’s Melvin Konner on how childhood has evolved.

Law and Order: the doink doink sound.

Bill Watterson’s letter announcing that he would be stopping Calvin and Hobbes.

Your friend, Conan (O’Brien).

Adobe, you brought an advertisement to a gun fight.

Finally, the 50 greatest hip-hop samples of all time.  Even if you’re not a hip-hop fan (and I’m not), this is fascinating.

Have a good weekend, everyone.

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MIPRO Consulting is a nationally-recognized consulting firm specializing in PeopleSoft Enterprise (particularly Enterprise Asset Management), Workday and Business Intelligence. You’re reading MIPRO Unfiltered, its blog. If you’d like to contact MIPRO, email is a great place to start, or you can easily jump over to its main website. If you’d like to see what MIPRO offers via Twitter or Facebook, we’d love to have you.

More Linkology posts.

The Children of Cyberspace

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My 2-year-old daughter surprised me recently with two words: “Daddy’s book.” She was holding my Kindle electronic reader.

Here is a child only beginning to talk, revealing that the seeds of the next generation gap have already been planted. She has identified the Kindle as a substitute for words printed on physical pages. I own the device and am still not completely sold on the idea.

My daughter’s worldview and life will be shaped in very deliberate ways by technologies like the Kindle and the new magical high-tech gadgets coming out this year — Google’s Nexus One phone and Apple’s impending tablet among them. She’ll know nothing other than a world with digital books, Skype video chats with faraway relatives, and toddler-friendly video games on the iPhone. She’ll see the world a lot differently from her parents.

Fascinating article from Brad Stone stating that, quite simply, the unflagging rate of tech advancement is creating mini generation gaps whereby these mini-generations can be identified and grouped by what technology they grow up with during formative years.  Makes perfect sense, because more than once I’ve observed that young kids today are familiar with an iPhone in a way that kids of eight years ago are not.  My son, now 5, tries to touch, swipe and pinch the screen of every mobile phone he comes across.  Eight years ago, kids would have been introduced to a BlackBerry or Windows Mobile phone or something from Nokia and then introduced to an iPhone.

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The Best of the Internet: Friday Links Edition for July 31, 2009

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  • Here’s John Gruber with a poignant analysis of Microsoft’s current state of the union.  No fanyboyism here, just some astute between-the-lines interpretation.
  • Michael Pollan, one of my favorite authors, explains the strange juxtaposition of the decline of American household cooking and the rise of watching people cook on TV.
  • I could not agree more with David Pogue’s grassroots movement to Take Back the Beep, which opposes the blatant money-grab by wireless carriers to have mandatory 15-second voicemail instructions.  At this point, if you don’t know how to use voicemail, you probably shouldn’t be operating a phone.
  • The good news: women are getting more beautiful.  The bad: men aren’t.  But it doesn’t seem to matter, evolutionarily-speaking.
  • Tom Insam: “It’s hard to like Android.” (thx John Gruber)
  • TechCrunch’s MG Siegler asks “Can AT&T Handle the iPhone?”  The only mistake in his excellent post is phrasing the title as a question.
  • Flarf is a form of postmodern poetry made by stringing together phrases from web searches.  As kottke notes, it began as a joke, and then evolved from bad to ‘sort of great’.
  • Finally, here’s a heckler I find amusing.  A jerk, yes, but an amusing jerk.

Have a great weekend, everyone.